The Topper Blog consists mainly of original writing by Rob & Russ Caplan with occasional special contributions and interviews. All photography in the blog is taken at Topper Fine Jewelers , or on location unless otherwise indicated in the photo captions.

The 2015 Glashütte Original PanoMaticLunar and PanoReserve

Left to Right: The PanoMaticLunar and the PanoReserve.

This year at Baselworld, Glashütte Original announced new variations to both the PanoMaticLunar and PanoReserve models for the first time since they were redesigned in 2012. While fans of the brand are certainly familiar with the "Pano" watches, what makes them unique from the rest of the Glashütte Original collection is the way that they feature offset dials and either a moonphase or power reserve complication at the two o'clock position of the dial. This design separates the complication from the watch, keeping both readable and giving a unique "complicated" look. In addition to the existing silver and gray options, Glashütte Original debuted blue dials in steel and black dials in rose gold. This post will take a look at three of the four new Pano models, which after a long wait, we just received at Topper.

While the blue dial color is new, the watches feature the same case and layout that were part of the redesign of 2012. At this time, the PanoMaticLunar evolved from its previous iteration which came out in 2003. The older PanoMaticLunar, a 39mm option, wore considerably smaller than the 1mm difference would suggest. This was due to its thicker inner bezel and smaller dial aperture.

The previous generation 39.2mm PanoMaticLunar with blue dial. The larger bezel gave it a much smaller aperture, and it wore considerably smaller than the current version.

The older PanoMaticLunar model also featured a dial of great contrasts. Along with a white moonphase display (a design feature retained in the current model), the hour indices are placed on high-contrast silver rings. The date wheels are white and feature black numbers. Both the date wheels and presentation of indices are much more blended on the new models.

Glashütte Original now has its own dial making facility which opened in Pforzheim, Germany in 2013. The facility has enabled them to create more specific features than were available in the previous generation. While the older blue PanoMaticlunar featured a date indicator with black numerals and a white background used in several models, the new model features a date wheel in a shade of blue that perfectly matches the dial. The transition between the date wheels and the dial is now especially smooth on the new model as the silver frame of the date wheel has been removed. The transition between dial and moon phase display is also more subtle on the 2015 model. The dial, which they are calling "galvanized blue," seems more vibrant and textured than on the older models.

As to the two different Pano options, the PanoMaticLunar is an automatic watch whose extra complication is a moonphase display, and the PanoReserve is a manual-wind piece whose complication is a power reserve indicator. As would be expected, the PanoMaticLunar is slightly thicker (12.7mm) than the PanoReserve (11.7m). This extra mm on the PanoMaticLunar is required to accommodate its power generating micro-rotor. The PanoMaticLunar is probably the prettier piece, while the PanoReserve looks more like a piece of sophisticated instrumentation. Both watches have incredibly beautiful movements.

The PanoMaticLunar uses the Calibre 90-02 which is a more attractive movement than the Calibre 39 or Calibre 100 resident in most of Glashütte Original's core models. What sets the Calibre 90-02 apart from the others is the use of blued screws and a hand-engraved balance cock with duplex swan-neck fine adjustment.

The manual-wind Caliber 65-01 in the PanoReserve features an unobstructed view of Glashütte Original's three-quarter plate with traditional Glashütte ribbing (stripes) and features the same identical hand-engraved balance cock with duplex swan-neck fine adjustment, screw-mounted gold chatons, and blued steel screws that make the Calibre 90-02 special. The PanoMaticLunar also features a striped three quarter plate, though the dominant feature is the off-centre rotor that takes up the viewable portion of the movement. As this rotor is adorned with a 19kt gold logo and weight, the PanoReserve movement almost seems spartan in comparison.

Below are pictures of the PanoMaticLunar and PanoReserve, both in steel and with the new blue dials, as well as an 18kt rose gold version of the PanoReserve with black dial. While we do not have the 18kt rose gold PanoMaticLunar in this photo shoot, we've been told that the two blacks are identical. Which one is your favorite?

The steel models each retail for $11,500, and the rose gold model retails for $23,900.

The PanoMaticLunar (left) and the PanoReserve (right).

The PanoMaticLunar 1-90-02-46-32-35.

The guilloche of the layered dials of the PanoMaticLunar.

The stars of the moon phase of the PanoMaticLunar.

The date complication of the PanoMaticLunar.

The 3 c'clock side of the case of the PanoMaticLunar.

The caseback and movement of the PanoMaticLunar.

A look at the micro-rotor of the PanoMaticLunar.

The hand-engraved balance cock with duplex swan-neck of the PanoMaticLunar.

The PanoReserve 1-65-01-26-12-35.

The guilloche of the layered dials of the PanoReserve is identical to the PanoMaticLunar.

The grande date complication of the PanoReserve.

The power reserve indicator and date display of the PanoReserve.

The caseback and movement of the PanoReserve.

The hand-engraved balance cock with duplex swan-neck of the PanoReserve.

The lume of the new "Pano" models. This one is the steel blue PanoMaticLunar.

PanoReserve 1-65-01-29-15-30.

The black dial of the 2015 18kt rose gold PanoReserve.

The power reserve indicator and date wheel of the PanoReserve in 18kt rose gold.

The 18kt gold case of the 2015 black dial PanoReserve.

The movement inside the 18kt gold PanoReserve.

The Topper Blog consists mainly of original writing by Rob & Russ Caplan with occasional special contributions and interviews. All photography in the blog is taken at Topper Fine Jewelers , or on location unless otherwise indicated in the photo captions.